Spitfire in my workshop. David Glen BSc (Hons) MSc: Model Maker, Journalist David Glen

Painting the exhaust stacks


Friday, 13th July, 2018

In May 2015 (Can it really be that long ago?) I described how I built the Spitfire’s exhaust stacks. Now, with the model about to be removed from its cradle and turned upright, I have painted the exhausts preparatory to fitting them.

The first stage was to spray the primed castings with Alclad Burnt Iron as a base coat. Then, with a fine nozzle for my Aztek airbrush and using close up photos of the full size stack as a guide, I applied a mottled dust coat of Precision Paints Light Rust, followed by a further dusting of the same shade lightened up with a little white.

Finally I applied some light grey/white pastel with a hint of deep purple here and there. The extreme edges of the circular outlet ports were dry brushed white plus a dash of rust. Importantly, the grey-black interiors of the ports were also weathered with some light grey pastel.

The two back plates onto which the individual exhaust stubs are bolted were also painted burnt iron followed by an overall rust colour.

The observant will notice the four studs (two top and bottom) ornamenting the flanges of each exhaust pot. These were added during the painting sequence. They are 14 BA brass nuts threaded onto the clipped off ends of 14 BA bolts and secured into holes in the flanges with CA glue.


Back to Spitfire MkIX Diary

The castings in primer, as pictured in November 2016.
Each of the exhaust pots is sprayed Alclad Burnt Iron as a base coat.
Note the addition of the tiny 14BA 'stud sets'.
Most of the weathering is done before assembly to the back plate, but the final touches are added after assembly stage.
The method for attaching the castings to their respective back plates: The 8BA studs are captive in the resin body. Before fitting I will add a dab of CA glue to each to guard against any of the nuts coming undone.
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